Invited Speakers

Michelle Cluver - Australian Astronomical Observatory
I'm from Cape Town, South Africa, where I developed an interest in Astronomy through my Dad, which led me to take a holiday job in high school at the Planetarium in Cape Town. Whilst working there part-time, I completed a BSc degree in Physics and Chemistry and further an Honours Degree in Theoretical Physics, both from the University of Cape Town. After teaching mathematics for several years I decided to return to my studies, this time a Masters in Astrophysics and Space Science, part of a brand new initiative in South Africa to promote careers in astronomy. I obtained a PhD in Astronomy in January 2009 having spent 9 months at Caltech, located in Los Angeles, on a Visiting Graduate Fellowship working on the analysis of Spitzer Space Telescope data of a rare star-forming, HI-massive galaxy. My first Postdoctoral Research position was at the Infrared Processing And Analysis Center (IPAC) at Caltech until November 2011, working on Stephan's Quintet and other compact groups, as well as star formation in gas-rich galaxies. Since then I have been based at the Australian Astronomical Observatory as a Super Science Fellow and an active member of the GAMA (Galaxy and Mass Assembly) Survey. I consider myself very fortunate to be able to observe on world-class telescopes and work with data from space telescopes.

Tracey Hill - JAO (Joint ALMA Observatory)
Tracey completed her PhD at the University of NSW in Sydney, Australia. She then moved to Europe where she undertook postdocs in Leiden, the Netherlands - with the Dutch ALMA Region Centre node, and then in Exeter, England. More recently Tracey completed a Marie Curie Eurotalents Fellowship hosted at the CEA in Saclay (France) in which she was working on Herschel data from the HOBYS (Motte et al.) key program.Tracey’s research is in the area of high mass star formation. She has undertaken largescale millimeter and submilllimetre continuum and spectral line studies in search of high–mass protostars, the progenitors of high –mass star formation. More recently, she has focused on cloud structure (with Herschel) to study interstellar filaments (where most star formation takes place) and identified high-column density ridges, which appear to be the preferential sites of high mass stars. She also showed that these ridges have similar properties as low-mass star-forming filaments testing hypotheses regarding thresholds for star formation. She has also studied the impact of OB clusters on highmass star formation, in particular on how nearby clusters can affect the evolutionary status of nearby cores.

Tracey completed her PhD at the University of NSW in Sydney, Australia. She then
moved to Europe where she undertook postdocs in Leiden, the Netherlands - with the
Dutch ALMA Region Centre node, and then in Exeter, England. More recently Tracey
completed a Marie Curie Eurotalents Fellowship hosted at the CEA in Saclay (France) in
which she was working on Herschel data from the HOBYS (Motte et al.) key program.
Tracey’s research is in the area of high mass star formation. She has undertaken largescale
millimeter and submilllimetre continuum and spectral line studies in search of
high–mass protostars, the progenitors of high –mass star formation. More recently, she
has focused on cloud structure (with Herschel) to study interstellar filaments (where
most star formation takes place) and identified high-column density ridges, which appear
to be the preferential sites of high mass stars. She also showed that these ridges have
similar properties as low-mass star-forming filaments testing hypotheses regarding
thresholds for star formation. She has also studied the impact of OB clusters on highmass
star formation, in particular on how nearby clusters can affect the evolutionary
status of nearby cores.

Slava Kitaeff - International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research
Graduated from The Urals State University (Russia) in 1990 with integrated Bachelor/Master in Physics & Astronomy. Defended PhD in radio astronomy instrumentation in 1998 at P.N.Lebedev Physical Institute. From 1990 to 2000 worked at Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory (Russia) where leaded the Computing and Communication group. Directed development of HPC and communications at Pushchino Research Centre of Russian Academy of Sciences in 1995-2000. In 2000-2003 lead R&D at Omnixmedia GmbH in Munich (Germany). From 2003 to 2011, Assistant Professor for Software Engineering at Auckland University of Technology (New Zealand). From 2011, Associate Professor for HPC at the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (The University of Western Australia). Member of IEEE from 2003. Member of IAU from 2005. Executive and Founding member of NZ SKA R&D Consortium from 2009 to 2011. The area of expertise: high performance computing, software engineering, system level design, radio astronomy instrumentation.

Paul Lasky - University of Melbourne
I am a postdoctoral research fellow in gravitational wave astrophysics at the University of Melbourne. I am interested in anything related to gravitational physics and Einstein’s General Relativity, with my work covering a broad range of research projects on neutron star and black hole physics, gravitational waves, cosmology, gravitational lensing and alternative theories of gravity. Following the completion of my PhD at Monash University in 2008, I undertook a brief postdoctoral position at Swinburne University before moving to the University of Tübingen in Germany, where I held an Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellowship. Since returning to Melbourne in 2011, I have become a member of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) Scientific Collaboration, contributing to the global gravitational wave detection effort through source modelling, data analysis and the development of computational infrastructure.

Michael Murphy - Swinburne University of Technology, Australia
I'm an observational astronomer studying cosmology, the Universe's properties and evolution on the largest possible scales. I specialise in studying the spectra of quasars, particularly the absorption lines imprinted on them by very distant galaxies between the quasars and Earth. A surprisingly large amount can be learnt about our Universe with this technique. For example, one novel application is to measure the fundamental constants of nature in the distant Universe, a field I've made significant contributions to. I completed my PhD in physics in 2002 at UNSW in Sydney and then spent 5 years at the University of Cambridge in the UK as a research fellow. I returned to Australia in 2007, taking up a faculty position at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne.

Kai Noekse - European Space Agency/Space Telescope Science Institute
I am an ESA astronomer, working as an instrument scientist for the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3. My research interests are galaxy evolution and star formation, especially observing the history of star formation in galaxies over cosmic time, and combining the results with theoretical galaxy models, to test the physical assumptions we make. I use multi-wavelength data from deep galaxy surveys, and am involved in several of the survey collaborations - DEEP, AEGIS, Spitzer SEDS, HST CANDELS - that combine terrestric and space telescopes to obtain deep multi-wavelength data of selected sky fields, to probe galaxy evolution and cosmology questions over large redshift ranges. I got my PhD from Goettingen University in Germany, working on star formation in nearby dwarf galaxies, then moved to Lick Observatory (Santa Cruz, USA) as a postdoc with the DEEP survey, working with Sandra Faber and David Koo. My second postdoctoral employment was as a Keck Foundation fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, USA), where I worked with Giovanni Fazio and the IRAC team as well as Lars Hernquist and his theory group. I moved to Baltimore to work at the Space Telescope Science Institute in 2010. Apart from research and HST work, I like being involved in public outreach and education activities, working with students, and hobbies that involve going fast.

Samantha Penny - Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
I am an observational astronomer, and my research interests are galaxy evolution and environment, dwarf galaxies, and ultra compact dwarfs. I carry out this work using data from a variety of telescopes, including the AAT, the Hubble Space Telescope and Keck. I obtained an MPhys in Physics with Astronomy from Cardiff University in 2006, and a PhD from the University of Nottingham in 2010. I then took up a six month Endeavour Award Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Centre for Astronomy and Supercomputing at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne Australia. I am currently an Australian Research Council Super Science Postdoctoral Fellow (research fellow) at the Monash Centre for Astrophysics at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia.

Greg Poole - University of Melbourne
I obtained my PhD from the University of Victoria (Canada) in 2007 after completing my MSc at the University of Toronto (Canada) and my BSc at the University of Waterloo (Canada). I have contributed to published studies in a variety of fields, from the thermal properties of interstellar dust and HST observations of stellar populations to simulations of galaxy cluster mergers and of the large-scale structure of the Universe. Since finishing my PhD and moving to Australia, I have been focused on the creation and analysis of very large dark matter simulations in support of large extragalactic survey programs. Presently, he is a postdoc at the University of Melbourne participating in Stuart Wyithe's DaRk Ages Galaxy and reiOnisation Simulations (DRAGONS) program, focusing on simulations of the first galaxies.

Jill Rathborne - Australian Telescope National Facility - CASS

Edward Taylor - University of Melbourne
My real name is Edward, but everyone calls me ned. I was born in Baltimore, but I'm better now. I did my PhD on '10 Billion Years of Massive Galaxies' in Leiden, in the Netherlands, and I'm still recovering. In my first postdoc, I worked as a member of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. This year, as a DECRA fellow, I have joined the SAMI survey team, and I'm starting to move into the field of weak gravitational lensing ... but with a twist! I care entirely too much about statistics, particularly when it comes to anything associated with galaxy mass. I'm a Bayesian, and you should be, too. By my estimation, I currently own four return tickets to London's worth of vinyl. My preferred way of spending an evening is in my new armchair, listening to music from my sweet Timeframe 540 towers, powered by a NAD 3020i integrated amp
.

Ivy Wong - CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science
My main research interest is in how galaxies start and stop forming stars. To study these processes, I use multi-wavelength observations (radio, IR, optical & UV) of nearby galaxies to shed light on the distributions and evolution of the gas, stellar and dust components within the galaxies. My PhD was completed in 2008 at the University of Melbourne & Johns Hopkins University working on a blind survey for Neutral Hydrogen (HIPASS) as well as a multi-wavelength study of star-forming galaxies in the nearby Universe. During my first postdoc at Yale University, I investigated the dust content and star formation in fast-evolving galaxies in the Virgo Cluster using observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope. My stint at Yale also started my collaboration with the Galaxy Zoo team with whom I worked on local post-starburst galaxies. Currently, I am a Super Science Fellow at CSIRO Astronomy & Space Science (CASS). In addition to my research work at CASS, I am a member of the early science commissioning team for the ASKAP-based WALLABY project.